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Home Other Resource Economics Studies

Other Resource Economics Studies

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A number of economic studies have been conducted in the region in recent years to support improved waste management practices, as well as improved management of coral reefs and mangroves. A list of these studies is provided below, and where possible, links to the full text reports have been provided. Links to recently published environmental economics toolkits are also included on this page.

Economics of Waste Management

Hajkowicz and Okotai, 2005. An Economic Valuation of Watershed Management in Rarotonga, Cook Islands. CSIRO Sustainable Ecosystems, Brisbane, Australia.
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Hajkowicz, Tellames and Aitaro, 2005. Economic Cost Scenarios for Solid Waste Related Pollution in Palau. SPREP IWP-Pacific Technical Report.
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Lal, P., Saloa, K. and Uili, F., 2006. Economics of Liquid Waste Management, Funafuti, Tuvalu. SPREP IWP-Pacific Technical Report 36.
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Lal and Takau, 2006. Economic Costs of Waste in Tonga. SPREP IWP-Pacific Technical Report
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Economics of Coral Reefs

Jacobs et al., 2004. Economic Valuation of Coral Reefs and Adjacent Habitats in American Samoa. Report prepared for the Department of Commerce, American Samoa.
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Lal,P. and A. Cerelala, 2005. Financial and Economic Analysis of Wild Harvest and Cultured Live Coral and Live Rock in Fiji. Report prepared for FSPI, SPREP and Department of Environment, Ministry of Lands and Mineral Resources, Fiji
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Lal, P. Coral Reef Use and Management- The Need, Role and Prospects of Economic Valuation in the Pacific. In: Ahmed, Chong & Cesar (Eds)
Economic Valuation and Policy Priorities for Sustainable Management of Coral reefs, WorldFish? Centre
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Van Beukering, P. et al., 2006. The Economic Value of the Coral Reefs of Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Report prepared by Cesar Environmental Consulting.
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Van Beukering, P. et al., 2005. The Economic Value of Guam’s Coral Reefs. Draft report, University of Guam.

Cesar, Van Beukering, Pintz and Dierking, 2002. The Economic Value of the Coral Reefs of Hawaii. Report prepared for NOAA and University of Hawaii.
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Economics of Mangroves

Lal, P., 2003. Economic Valuation of Mangroves and Decision-Making? in the Pacific. Ocean and Coastal Management 46, pp.823-844.

Naylor, R. and Drew, M., 1998. Valuing Mangrove Resources in Kosrae, Micronesia. Environment and Development Economics. 3, pp. 471-490.

Economics of Protected Areas

Iverson, T., 2008. The Economic Impact of a Proposed Mariana Trench Marine National Monument: An Exploratory Study. Report prepared for the Pew Centre for Environment.
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Van Beukering and Cesar, 2004. Economic Analysis of Marine Managed Areas in the Main Hawaiian Islands. Report prepared for NOAA.
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Economic Value of Marine and Terrestrial Resources

Mohd-Shahwahid? and McNally?, 2001. An Economic Valuation of the Terrestrial and Marine Resources of Samoa. Report prepared for the Division of Environment and Conservation, MNRE Samoa, WWF-UK and WWF-South Pacific
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Environmental Economics Toolkits

United Nations Development Programme, 2007. Environmental Economics Tool Kit: Analyzing the Economic Costs of Land Degradation and the Benefits of Sustainable Land Management
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Joint Nature Conservation Committee, 2007. Valuing the Environment in Small Islands - An Environmental Economics Toolkit
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Last Updated on Thursday, 06 November 2014 07:32  


Newsflash

This year Kiribati, one of the least developed countries in the world, finalised maritime boundaries with the United States of America.

The successful outcome, in September, was the result of the work that the Pacific Island country, along with 12 others, undertook at the Maritime Boundaries and Ocean Governance working sessions at the University of Sydney.

The latest session is currently underway at the University and ends on 6 December.

"Technical and legal personnel from thesePacific Islandcountries have been coming to the University of Sydney for the last six years to secure rights to their marine spaces," said Professor Elaine Baker from the University's School of Geosciences, which hosts the meetings.

"Global interest in marine resources, including fisheries and seabed minerals, and the threat of climate change and sea level rise, has spurred Pacific Island countries to settle their maritime boundaries."

The Cook Islands, for example, has valuable deposits of seabed minerals, many of which are essential to new technologies such as renewable energy and communications equipment. In order for the Cook Islands to capitalise on these resources, they require sound governance frameworks and jurisdictional boundaries.