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Home News & Media Releases Latest Out Of Darkness - A Deep Sea Minerals Project Documentary

Out Of Darkness - A Deep Sea Minerals Project Documentary

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"Out of Darkness" documentary focuses on environmental impacts of deep sea mining.

Following the success of its first documentary "Under Pressure", the SPC-EU Deep Sea Minerals project has now produced a second 25-minute film that focuses on the potential environmental issues related to the extraction of deep sea mineral resources.

This new film, titled “Out of Darkness”, includes some spectacular underwater footage and interviews with leading scientists such as Dr Malcolm Clarke from NIWA, Dr Jim Hein from the US Geological Survey and Dr Ray Binns from CSIRO.

The film can be viewed on the Deep Sea Minerals Project website and free copies of the DVD can be obtained by emailing: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

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Last Updated on Sunday, 16 February 2014 12:36  

Newsflash

In the years leading up to 2010, the Pacific Island leaders decided to integrate the Pacific Islands Applied GeoScience Commission (formerly known as CCOP/SOPAC) into the Secretariat of the Pacific Community. To implement this historical alignment of the two organisations, the leaders called to arms an internationally renowned geoscientist, who immediately left his well deserved retirement on Viti Levu's Coral Coast and reported to duty at Mead Road, Suva.

The then-incumbent, Dr. Russell Howorth, had been an integral part of SOPAC from its early years in the 70's, and still continues to be one of the main stalwarts of the organisation. Over the years, he has been instrumental in bringing about the prestige and recognition that SOPAC has in the region today.

A native of Yorkshire, Great Britain, Dr. Howorth did his PhD. in Geology from Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand, after a brief stint as a mining geologist in Zambia. He first visited the fledgling CCOP/SOPAC while on secondment at the University of South Pacific (USP) in early 1979. CCOP/SOPAC was then a United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Regional project with less than 10 staff members.

During his early years in the South Pacific, he was best known for his achievement in establishing the Certificate in Earth Science and Marine Geology. The Certificate brought three organizations -- CCOP/SOPAC, USP, and Victoria University of Wellington -- together in the early eighties to offer what was a unique opportunity for an academic course with a practical focus for geologists and technicians in the region.