SOPAC - Applied Geoscience and Technology Division - SPC

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Map and Spatial Data Repository

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Map and Spatial Data Repository

SOPAC's core work program involves the production of a lot of geographical information systems output; and these are mostly some combination of digital maps and geo-referenced datasets. GIS specialists within the the work programmes utilize a diverse set of toolsets to create, manage, analyze and display geospatial data on digital maps, which are acquired from diverse sources.  

From 2010, SOPAC ICT has attempted to unify and catalogue SOPAC's diverse spatial data collection under a standardised, secure and user-friendly system, with the goal of having a common platform that will not only make SOPAC’s GIS work more visible to the member countries (and the general public at large), but will also prove endlessly useful to SOPAC staff in their day to day work.

Applied GeoScience and Technology Division (AGTD) has a number of public geospatial data repositories which could be accessed by clicking the product logo's below:

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Last Updated on Sunday, 13 July 2014 19:03  

Newsflash

Tuesday, 24 September 2013, Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC), Suva, Fiji – Regional experts in land and marine survey and management commended the work of the AusAID-funded Pacific Sea Level Monitoring (PSLM) Project at the International Federation of Surveyors (FIG) Symposium in Suva last week.

Among them was Professor John Hannah of the University of Otago, who chairs the FIG Climate Change Task Force. Addressing the conference, Professor Hannah said, ‘Monitoring is crucial. We need reference systems and data sets that allow us to monitor change accurately.’

‘I congratulate our colleagues in the Pacific Sea Level Monitoring Project ─ thanks to that initiative, many small islands have a reliable continuous data set.  We need to see more of this in the region.’

The project has been collecting data from 14 sites across the Pacific since 1991. Over-water monitoring stations in Fiji, Tonga, Samoa, Vanuatu, Papua New Guinea, Marshall Islands, Pohnpei, Kiribati, Cook Islands, Palau, Tuvalu, and Nauru provide a continuous stream of high-quality data on sea level, tides, water and air temperature, barometric pressure, and windspeed and direction. In addition, land-based global navigation satellite system (GNSS) stations in each country measure seismic movements and provide geodetic benchmarks for the sea-level stations.

All of this data is necessary for scientists to calculate sea-level change relative to land elevation. The data has many other uses, however. It is publically accessible and is frequently referenced for coastal development projects, urban planning, tidal predictions, formulation of maritime boundaries, wave modelling and for navigational purposes.